Most recent

7 Jun 2017

First Report of Pythium aphanidermatum Causing Root Rot and Decline of Poinsettia in Maryland

Del Castillo Múnera, J. (University of Maryland) and C.L. Swett (University of California, Davis)

The publication is one of the outcomes from the statewide monitoring of water-borne oomycetes to provide critical control point assessment to nursery producers. Pythium aphanidermatum was isolated from poinsettia exhibiting root rot symptoms.  Healthy poinsettia were inoculated in a greenhouse experiment with isolates recovered from the root rot resulted in wilting and root rot symptoms.  P. aphanidermatum was recovered, confirming that it is a poinsettia pathogen in Maryland.  This new information enables regional diagnosticians and crop advisors to provide more accurate information to producers, and facilitates research efforts to improve root disease management.

See the link bellow

http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/10.1094/PDIS-11-16-1671-PDN

26 May 2017

Next Generation Sequencing of Oomycete Communities in Nursery Irrigation Water

Eberhart, J., Funahashi, F., Foster, Z.S.L., Parke, J. (Oregon State University)

Our current research is focused on helping plant nurseries monitor oomycete pathogens in their irrigation water to determine the need for water treatment, evaluate effectiveness of treatment options, and enable selection of cost-effective ways to disinfest water. Once protocols have been fully developed and validated, Illumina sequencing has the potential to be a sensitive method to detect, identify, and estimate the relative abundance of oomycete communities from water samples. We will use this knowledge to help nursery managers make informed decisions about effective water disinfestation strategies, reducing the risk of establishment of plant pathogens.

Sudden Oak Death 6th Science Symposium June 2016 (2554 KB)

25 May 2017

Diffusing Water Conservation and Treatment Technologies to Nursery and Greenhouse Growers

Lamm, A.J., Warner, L.A., Taylor, M.R., Martin, E.T., Fisher, P. (University of Florida), White, S. (Clemson University)

In-depth interviews were conducted with 24 operators across the U.S. to identify their perceptions of new water-saving technologies and treatments. The findings revealed growers are aware of water-saving technologies and the rate of adoption depends on a variety of factors including: perceived cost, lack of ability of their workforce to use the new technology due to its complexity, and belief that their product will be worth more if it is grown in an environmentally-friendly manner. Barriers to adoption included the high cost of replacing equipment, incompatibility with existing systems, and the perception that new technologies do not fit in with the traditional hands-on approach to horticulture. We need to develop materials that highlight the economic benefit of adoption and cost recovery, YouTube videos that reduce issues with perceived complexity should also be developed for growers so they can use them with their workers.

Journal of International Agriculture and Extension Education April 2017 (639 KB)

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