Most recent

4 Aug 2017

Comparison of Three Production Scenarios for Buxus microphylla var. japonica ‘Green Beauty’ Marketed in a No. 3 Container on the West Coast Using Life Cycle Assessment

Ingram, D.L., Knight, J. (University of Kentucky), Hall, C.R. (Texas A&M)

The impact of west coast production scenarios for boxwood marketed in a #3 container on carbon footprint (CF; kilograms of carbon dioxide equivalents (kg CO2e)) and variable costs at the nursery gate for Scenario A (propagation to #1 to #3 container) was 2.198 kg CO2e with variable costs of $4.043.  Scenario B (propagation to field to #3 container) was a CF of 1.717 kg CO2e with variable costs of $2.880 and take a year longer in production than the other two models.  The CF of Scenario C (propagation to #1 to #2 to #3 containers) would be 3.364 kg CO2e with variable costs of $5.733. Containers, transplants/transplanting, irrigation, and fertilization accounted for the greatest portion of CF and variable costs in each scenario.  

See the link here

http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/52/3/357.abstract

19 Jul 2017

Yield, quality and profitability of sensor‑controlled irrigation: a case study of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.) production

Saavoss, M., Belayneh, B., Lea‑Cox, J., Lichtenberg, E. (University of Maryland), Majsztrik, J. (Clemson University)

On-farm research has found a number of advantages of sensor-based irrigation compared to current irrigation practices including reduced water application, disease incidence, production time and labor, and increased profitability. We examined the effects of sensor-based irrigation in a commercial greenhouse producing cut-flower snapdragons. We calculated changes in yield, production time, quality, cost, revenue and profit, using 3 years of data before and after implementation of sensor irrigation networks.  Sensor-based irrigation increased revenue by 62% and profit by 65% per year. Sensor-based irrigation was also associated with increases in the quality and the number of stems harvested per crop.

See the article in the link bellow

https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00271-016-0511-y.pdf

7 Jun 2017

First Report of Pythium aphanidermatum Causing Root Rot and Decline of Poinsettia in Maryland

Del Castillo Múnera, J. (University of Maryland) and C.L. Swett (University of California, Davis)

The publication is one of the outcomes from the statewide monitoring of water-borne oomycetes to provide critical control point assessment to nursery producers. Pythium aphanidermatum was isolated from poinsettia exhibiting root rot symptoms.  Healthy poinsettia were inoculated in a greenhouse experiment with isolates recovered from the root rot resulted in wilting and root rot symptoms.  P. aphanidermatum was recovered, confirming that it is a poinsettia pathogen in Maryland.  This new information enables regional diagnosticians and crop advisors to provide more accurate information to producers, and facilitates research efforts to improve root disease management.

See the link bellow

http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/10.1094/PDIS-11-16-1671-PDN

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